I’d like to be a submariner. How hard could that be?

theleansubmariner

Caution: Some salty language may be found in this post

I belong to a number of very fine military organizations that all have special purposes. The Navy League for instance is a group that supports and promotes the sea services. I think this is important because of the dangers still present in the world at large. The American Legion and VFW both focus on active duty and veterans benefits so they are also near and dear to my heart. MOAA (Military Officers Association of America) is a fine group of leaders who help to ensure Congress doesn’t spend all of its money giving themselves haircuts and special deals that average citizens will never imagine.

But the organization that really holds my heart is the USSVI –

United States Submarines Veterans, Inc.

Riding high 2

I have belonged to the group for a number of years but wasn’t very active until recently. Work and…

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The Journalist’s Guide To Writing About The Royal Navy

J D Davies

Inspired by the consistently dreadful coverage of naval matters in the British media, as highlighted by such recent stories as ‘300 admirals and captains for 19 warships’ (thank you, the Daily Fail) and the announcement of the closure of the shipbuilding yard at Portsmouth.

  1. Firstly, and above all, not all warships are ‘battleships’. The battleship is [a] a specific type of warship [b] old [c] big [d] very, very big. Thus to describe a frigate or (worse) a minesweeper as a ‘battleship’ is essentially the same as describing a Cocker Spaniel as a Rottweiler: all three ships are warships, just as the Cocker and the Rott are both dogs, but that’s about as far as the similarity goes.
  2. The Royal Navy does not have ’19 warships’. It has 19 destroyers and frigates, but these are not the only types of warships. There are bigger ones (e.g. helicopter carriers and…

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US Navy WAVES in photographs 1943-45

Photo #: NH 89582-KN (Color). “WAVES’ Anniversary”, 1943. Cartoon by Sixta, USNR, depicting events and activities in the first year following the 30 July 1942 authorization of the WAVES. Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection, Washington, DC. U.S. NHHC Photograph.

Photo #: 80-G-K-13754 (Color). WAVE Specialist (Photographer) 3rd Class. Saluting, as she stands among the springtime cherry blossoms near the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C., during World War II. Note her Specialist “P” rating badge. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-14518 (Color). U.S. Naval Training Center, Women’s Reserve, The Bronx, New York. Some of the schools trainees march in formation behind their color guard, during World War II. This Training Center, located in the facilities of Hunter College, provided basic training for Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard women recruits. Note the Center’s flag, featuring the fouled anchor and propeller device of the Women’s Reserve. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-13879 (Color). Navy WAVE trainee. Leans on a swab while cleaning her barracks, soon after she arrived at a Naval Training Center during World War II. Photographed prior to April 1944. Note suitcases at right, and dungaree working uniform with button fly. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-5568 (Color). WAVES on liberty in Honolulu. Yeoman 3rd Class Margaret Jean Fusco photographs three friends by King Kamehameha’s statue in Honolulu, circa spring 1945. Posing are (left to right): Yeoman 2nd Class Jennie Reinhart; Yeoman 2nd Class Muriel Caldwell and Yeoman 2nd Class June Read. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-4563 (Color). USS Missouri (BB-63). WAVES visiting the ship in an east coast port, during her shakedown period, circa August 1944. They are standing on the main deck at the bow, with the Navy Jack flying behind them. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-272753. Transporting WAVES by air, November 1944. WAVEs en route to Naval Air Station, Olathe, Kansas, in a Douglas R4D-6 transport plane, accompanied by their instructor, Lieutenant (Junior Grade) N.J. Merrill. Most of the enlisted WAVES are strikers for the rate of Specialist (Transport Airman). Those present are (from left to right): LtJG Merrill; Yeoman 2nd Class Carolyn Fish; Seaman 2nd Class Gale Collier; Seaman 2nd Class Margaret Chapman; Seaman 2nd Class Gloria Marx; Yeoman 2nd Class Helen Niravelli; Seaman 2nd Class Marilyn Wheeler; and Seaman 2nd Class Helen Ranlett. Note cargo track in the plane’s deck. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-5793 (Color). Yeoman 1st Class Marjorie Daw Adams, USNR(W). Obtains a receipt from Mailman 2nd Class Wilbur L. Harrison, who is picking up classified mail for his attack transport, at Fleet Post Office, San Francisco, California, on 13 June 1945. He is armed with a handgun for security reasons. Much of the official Navy mail going to the Pacific Fleet passes through the Fleet Post Office’s Registry Office. Note WAVES recruiting poster in the background. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-5460 (Color). U.S. Naval Hospital, San Diego, California. WAVE Pharmacist’s Mate 3rd Class Winifred Perosky prepares to X-Ray Marine Private First Class Harold E. Reyher, circa spring 1945. She is one of 1000 WAVES assigned to the Naval Hospital at San Diego. PFC Reyher had been wounded by an enemy sniper on Iwo Jima. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-5675 (Color). WAVE air station control tower crew. At a Naval Air Station in the Hawaiian islands, circa mid-1945. Specialist 2nd Class Mary E. Johnson uses a microphone to speak to an incoming plane, as Specialist 2nd Class Lois Stoneburg operates a signal lamp. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-43935. Aviation Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Violet Falkum. Turns over the Pratt & Whitney R-1340 radial engine of a SNJ-4 training plane, at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, 30 November 1943. This photograph was used in a World War II recruiting poster. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Photo #: 80-G-K-14222 (Color). WAVES study aircraft mechanics. At Naval Air Station, Lakehurst, New Jersey, during World War II.
Seaman 2nd Class Elaine Olsen (left) and Seaman 2nd Class Ted Snow are learning to take down a radial aircraft engine block. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

[US] Navy Prepares Fleet for More Arctic Missions | DoD Buzz

From the Bridge Blog

The Navy is accelerating research and technology programs aimed at preparing the fleet to operate in the Arctic.

Navy leaders had been preparing to increase the services’ Arctic presence by the mid-2030s, but they are now accelerating the timetable to the mid-2020s due to the warming of the waters and the rapid pace of melting ice.

Rising water temperatures means less ice in the Arctic, creating a circumstance wherein more open waterways will emerge. As a result, the Navy is putting the final touches on a new Updated Arctic Road Map designed to help the service achieve a more Arctic-capable fleet.

The Updated Arctic Road Map is aimed at paving the way toward creating the investments and technologies needed to ensure the Navy can weather the rigorous challenges of the Arctic environment.

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via Navy Prepares Fleet for More Arctic Missions | DoD Buzz.

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