Russians Build Three 33,540 ton Nuclear Icebreakers

Russia is building three new nuclear-powered icebreakers. USA falling behind.

Chuck Hill's CG Blog

Russia's '50 let Pobedy' is currently the world's largest icebreaker, displacing over 25,000 tons. Photo: Creative CommonsRussia’s ’50 let Pobedy’ is currently the world’s largest icebreaker, displacing over 25,000 tons. Photo: Creative Commons

gCaptain reports the Russians are building three huge 33,540 ton 173.3 meter (569 foot) nuclear powered icebreakers that are expected to be delivered by 2020, with the first to be completed in 2017.

These ships will be almost two and a half times as large as the Polar Class.

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British naval losses at Dunkirk on 30 may 1940

There were fewer losses of major vessels on 30 May compared to the previous day, due in part to the decision of Capt Wm. Tennant, SNO Dunkirk, to only allow one destroyer at a time to enter the harbour. This ensured that there was less congestion and fewer targets were presented to German aircraft.

HMS King Orry (Cdr J. Elliot, RNR), a passenger steamer from the Isle of Man Steam Packet company requisitioned by the Royal Navy for use as an Armed Boarding Vessel (ABV) in both the First and Second World War, attacked and badly damaged by German dive bombers. Scuttled clear of the harbour.

Isle of Man Steam Packet Tynwald passes wreck of sister ship King Orry at Dunkirk.

French destroyer Bourrasque struck a mine off Nieuwpoort, Beligium (ironically, a French-laid minefield). Survivors taken off by French torpedo boat Branlebas, Admiralty drifter Yorkshire Lass, and armed trawler HMT Ut Prosim.

French destroyer Bourrasque mined and sunk off Nieuwpoort on 30 May 1940

French destroyer Bourrasque sunk off Nieuwpoort, Belgium on 30 May 1940 during Operation Dynamo. She had sailed from Dunkirk at 1530 with over 600 troops embarked. She struck a mine 5-miles north of Nieuwpoort and began to sink. Survivors were taken off by the French torpedo boat Branlebas, Admiralty drifter Yorkshire Lass, and the armed trawler HMT Ut Prosim.

French destroyer Bourrasque sunk by mine off Nieuwpoort on 30 May 1940. IWM HU 2280.

French destroyer Bourrasque sunk by mine off Nieuwpoort on 30 May 1940. IWM HU 2280.

Pier constructed of British Army lorries on beach at La Panne, 1940

Ad hoc pier constructed of British Army lorries topped with decking at La Panne, 1940. Construction of piers was suggested by Cdr Richardson, RN on the morning of 30 May. The piers – built by British sappers from 1st Division – were constructed at Bray-Dunes and La Panne. They enabled Dunkirk’s “little ships” to continue the evacuation regardless of tides.

Bridge constructed of British army lorries topped with decking, La Panne, 1940.

Bridge constructed of British army lorries topped with decking, La Panne, 1940.

HMS Hebe embarked RAdm Wake-Walker, SNO Afloat, off Dunkirk on 30 May 1940

Halcyon-class minesweeper HMS Hebe embarked Rear Admiral Frederic Wake-Walker on 30 May 1940. Wake-Walker assumed role as Senior Naval Officer (SNO) Afloat, supervising shipping offshore during the evacuation. Later that day, Hebe lifted 633 troops from the beaches.

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR
THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR© IWM (A 1434)