Favourite photos of 2013 #5: Royal Navy divers in Antarctica

Royal Navy divers from the Ice Patrol Vessel HMS Protector are pictured diving beside an iceberg near Detaille Island, Antarctica. A Royal Navy Clearance Diver spends months training to become fully conversant with underwater search, engineering and Explosive Ordnance Disposal. Diving in zero visibility is common; underwater tasks are both physically and psychologically demanding. © Crown Copyright 2013. Photographer: LA(Phot) Arron Hoare

HMS Protector leaves Portsmouth for the last time

HMS Protector (A173) was chartered in 2011 as a temporary replacement for HMS Endurance (A171). She was purchased outright by the Ministry of Defence in 2013 when it became clear that Endurance would not return to service.

Navy’s ice patrol ship leaves Portsmouth for the last time

by Sam Bannister
sam.bannister@thenews.co.uk

The Royal Navy’s ice patrol ship HMS Protector has left Portsmouth for the last time today.

Her ship’s company are off on a double deployment to the frozen continent of Antarctica.

When the ship returns, she will head for her new home port of Devonport in Plymouth.

The 5,000-­tonne ship will stay in the region for two consecutive deployments, returning to the UK in spring 2015.

She will conduct surveys and patrols on behalf of the UK Hydrographic Office, British Antarctic Survey and Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

HMS Protector’s commanding officer, Captain Rhett Hatcher, said: ‘The ship’s company have worked incredibly hard in training and preparation over the summer.

‘We have installed a number of equipment upgrades and improvements and having completed operational sea training we are now ready for the challenges of the planned double deployment.

‘Experienced members of the crew and new ones alike are very much looking forward to this deployment and proudly flying the White Ensign and the Union Flag around the Antarctic territories and the region.’


http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/defence/navy-s-ice-patrol-ship-leaves-portsmouth-for-the-last-time-1-5593988

HMS Endurance to be scrapped, HMS Protector offers “offers good value for money”

Endurance been out of service since 2008. All we’ve been doing for the last 5-years is waiting for the shoe to drop. Protector is a perfectly adequate replacement. So there’s no need for drama. Besides which, the Endurance that many of you are no doubt thinking of is this one (1967-1991) and not this one (1991-2008).

HMS Endurance: Former ice patrol ship to be scrapped

HMS Endurance, which was replaced by HMS Protector in 2011, is also known as Red Plum

The Royal Navy’s former ice patrol ship HMS Endurance – damaged when its engine control room flooded off the Chilean coast in 2008 – is to be scrapped.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said the Portsmouth-based ship, which was replaced by HMS Protector in 2011, would go out of service in 2015.

A MoD spokesman said the “damage sustained” by the ship off Chile meant repairs were not “economically viable”.

The incident near South America saw 15 civilians airlifted to safety.

The spokesman said: “Given the level of damage sustained and the subsequent deterioration of the ship, it was not considered economically viable to repair her.”

‘Value for money’

The mission of the ship, which is also known as Red Plum, was to patrol and survey the Antarctic and South Atlantic. That duty has now being undertaken by HMS Protector.

HMS Protector underwent a refit to join the Royal Navy.

HMS Protector was built in 2001 as an Antarctic research ship and was formerly known under the Norwegian name of MV Polarbjorn.It underwent a refit to join the Royal Navy and was officially named HMS Protector in June 2011.

The MoD spokesman said £5m had been spent “to bring HMS Protector up to the Royal Navy’s world-class standards” and work had been done to improve the ship’s communications systems and add specialist hydrographic equipment, including a survey motor boat.

“The purchase of HMS Protector offers good value for money and secures the UK’s long term ice patrol survey capability,” he said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-24436594

Major icebreakers of the world

Only the “majors.” Smaller vessels (less than 10,000 HP), such as the Royal Navy’s HMS Protector, and “ice-strengthened” vessels such as the British Antarctic Survey’s RRS Ernest Shackleton, are not included.

U.S. Coast Guard’s 2013 Reivew of Major Ice Breakers of the World

The Coast Guard Office of Waterways and Ocean Policy (CG-WWM) began producing the chart of major icebreakers of the world in July 2010. Since then, we have gathered icebreaker information and recommendations from a variety of sources and experts, including icebreaker subject-matter experts, internet posts, news updates, Arctic experts and Coast Guard offices with icebreaker equities. We validate our information within the public forum and update the chart at least semi-annually based on new information and feedback. This chart represents the Coast Guard’s current factual understanding of the major icebreaker fleet. This chart is not intended for icebreaker fleet comparisons and no inference should be drawn regarding a country’s icebreaker “ranking” against another.

The following is the July 18, 2013 review by the U.S. Coast Guard of Major Icebreakers of the World.

Scope. Vessels meeting the general definition of a polar icebreaker per the 2007 National Research Council report on Polar Icebreakers in a Changing World are included. These vessels “have sailed in significant sea ice in either the Arctic or the Antarctic,” have “ice strengthening sufficient for polar ice” and possess “installed power of at least 10,000 horsepower.” Minimally ice-strengthened ships (enough to survive in ice, rather than operate in it) and icebreakers of less than 10,000 horsepower are not included. With the exception of the Baltic icebreakers, this chart does not indicate where their owners may actually operate them. In addition, the chart does not specify whether a vessel’s crew is civilian or military.

Classification Methodology: The chart organizes the icebreakers first by country, then by installed power category, and finally in order of placement in service, youngest to oldest. The chart colors icebreakers by their relative capability estimated using brake horsepower as the most common basis. The most capable icebreakers are black, the next level sea-green and the lightest icebreakers are blue. Icebreakers in construction are colored yellow, and planned icebreakers are white. Planned icebreakers are placed on the chart if we can reliably state they are funded. The chart identifies government-owned or -operated icebreakers with the country’s flag next to the icebreaker. Nuclear-powered icebreakers are marked with an N. Baltic icebreakers designed to operate solely in seasonal, first-year Baltic Sea ice but meeting the ice-strengthening and horsepower criteria are marked on the chart with a B. Most Baltic icebreakers may not have operated in the Arctic due to concerns with open-ocean sea-keeping ability for open water transits.

Fleet numbers and Icebreaker Size in Context. The fleet numbers and icebreaker size tend to align along each county’s economic necessity for icebreaker resources. For example, the economies of Finland, Russia and Sweden have greater dependence on major icebreakers to pursue economic goals in the Arctic and Baltic winters than the economies of other nations. Also, ice in these countries’ shipping lanes, rivers and ports forms earlier, lasts longer, and requires more power to break, requiring more extensive icebreaking capabilities. Similarly, the Canadian icebreaker fleet supports summer access and supply to Canada’s Arctic communities. In contrast, in addition to the polar icebreakers already listed, the U.S has a number of icebreakers operating in the Great Lakes, New England and the mid-Atlantic to facilitate commerce and for exigent circumstances, but these are not listed in this chart because the icebreakers are not required to meet the threshold of at least 10,000 BHP.

An undated photo of USCGC Healy (WAGB – 20). US Coast Guard Photo

http://news.usni.org/2013/07/23/u-s-coast-guards-2013-reivew-of-major-ice-breakers-of-the-world